Mid-August Link Assortment

August 22, the long-dormant Seattle IF group is meeting at 7:00 p.m. at Four Generals Brewery in Renton.  The plan is to play through Ryan Veeder’s new game “Curse of the Garden Isle.”

August 23 is the next meeting of the Boston IF group.

Introcomp is live, and invites you to play and judge excerpts of longer interactive fiction games based on how much you’d like to play the rest of the game. This is a long-running IF community tradition that lets participants collect early feedback on their game concepts and works in progress. If you’d like to participate, the games are available here, and voting runs through August 31.

inkle studios has announced ink jam, a jam for people writing in ink, running August 31-September 3.

September 8 is the next SF Bay Area IF Meetup.

If you’re planning to enter IF Comp, you should submit your intent to enter before the beginning of September, as well.

October 6-7, Roguelike Celebration is coming up in San Francisco — this is obviously a bit different from IF material, but there’s some interesting procedural storytelling work that comes up in this space. This year their speakers include Tarn Adams, Pippin Barr, and Max Kreminski, all people who have turned up on this blog/in IF circles before.

November 10-11, AdventureX will return, this time at the British Library. AdventureX is a conference focused on narrative rich games, whether those are mobile or desktop, text-based or graphical; it’s grown significantly in size and professionalism over the last couple of years, and last year pretty definitively outgrew its previous venue. I am mentioning this well in advance because they’ve mentioned that tickets will be cheaper for early bird buyers — so it’s something to keep an eye on if you think you’ll want to go.

*

Continue reading

The Harbinger’s Head (Kim Berkley / Choice of Games Hosted)

Harbingers Head promo landscape 01 final.png

The Harbinger’s Head is a fantasy horror story from Kim Berkley, in Choice of Games’ Hosted Games category.  It’s set in 1820s Ireland, in which the player encounters a supernatural creature — a kind of headless horseman character — and has to agree to help find his missing head.

The story that follows is focused on action and folklore. You’re partly collecting stories to try to piece together what has really happened in this supernatural situation, but there’s also quite a bit of violence, and one moment where it felt like my protagonist was implicitly under sexual threat, though this passed quickly. Descriptions often focus on the physical, and the game’s text doesn’t hesitate to tell you when you’re supposed to be feeling afraid.

The diction of The Harbinger’s Head sometimes feels substantially more modern than its period — there’s a reference to cutting and pasting something, for instance, and while both concepts individually certainly existed in the past, the paired idiom belongs to the computer age.

But for the most part it does deliver on the folkloric feel. There are several types of faerie creatures, but not your standard vampires and werewolves. Promises are made in desperation and redeemed in less than ideal circumstances. Old bonds of family come into play; so does the conflict between Church and Faerie (though fairly lightly, in the playthrough I experienced).

Continue reading

End of July Link Assortment

August 15, London IF Meetup hears from James Wallis on tabletop RPGs and storygames. This is a field where some of the most interesting narrative design is happening right now, and Wallis is an expert. As always, the event is free and there are drinks and hanging-out afterward.

inkle studios has announced ink jam, a jam for people writing in ink, running August 31-September 3.

November 10-11, AdventureX will return, this time at the British Library. AdventureX is a conference focused on narrative rich games, whether those are mobile or desktop, text-based or graphical; it’s grown significantly in size and professionalism over the last couple of years, and last year pretty definitively outgrew its previous venue. I am mentioning this well in advance because they’ve mentioned that tickets will be cheaper for early bird buyers — so it’s something to keep an eye on if you think you’ll want to go.

My Lady’s Choosing (Kitty Curran, Larissa Zageris)

Screen Shot 2018-04-29 at 2.43.30 PM.pngMy Lady’s Choosing is a branching romance novel — or, arguably, spoof of romance novels. It begins with the heroine as a just-about-penniless lady’s companion, then immediately introduces her to two eligible bachelors and one wealthy and outrageous female friend.

From there, we are offered a buffet of standard tropes. There’s your obligatory Scottish hero with a castle and a lot of dialect-speaking servants who’ve known him since his youth. There’s a Mr Darcy-minus-the-serial-number whose estate is called (I am not making this up) Manberley. There’s a Jane Eyre plot strand with the brooding Man With A Past and a surviving child (and an optional Distraction Vicar if you want to go that way). There’s a subplot with Napoleonic spies and another subplot involving raising the lost tomb of Hathor in Egypt. There’s a side character who is a callback to a side character in Emma, and a sinister servant who owes a lot to Mrs. Danvers, and an obligatory call-out to that summer on the shores of Lake Geneva with Lord Byron. The encyclopedic approach to tropes reminded me of Tough Guide to Fantasyland, as transported to another genre.

Continue reading

Mid-July Link Assortment

July 15 is the next meeting of the Boston/Cambridge PR-IF.

July 21st, 3-5 p.m. at Mad City Coffee in Columbia, the Baltimore/DC group meets to discuss The Wand.

July 31st in Canterbury (UK) there is a session on how to build escape rooms for libraries.

Gothic Novel Jam is a jam for games or works inspired by the gothic novel in any fashion, and is running throughout July. IF and related narrative games are welcome.

Screen Shot 2018-06-10 at 4.20.43 PM.pngIntroComp is now accepting intents to enter. IntroComp is a competition in which you can submit just an excerpt of an unfinished interactive fiction game, and receive feedback from players about what they liked or didn’t like about it. If you’d like to participate as an author, register with the site immediately (this closes June 30, so today). Games themselves must be submitted by July 31 and judging will occur during August.

Entry registration and prize donation for IF Comp are now open as well, if you’re expecting to have something more complete in the near future.

August 4 is the next meeting of the SF Bay IF Meetup.

August 15, London IF Meetup hears from James Wallis on tabletop RPGs and storygames. This is a field where some of the most interesting narrative design is happening right now, and Wallis is an expert. As always, the event is free and there are drinks and hanging-out afterward.

inkle studios has announced ink jam, a jam for people writing in ink, running August 31-September 3.

November 10-11, AdventureX will return, this time at the British Library. AdventureX is a conference focused on narrative rich games, whether those are mobile or desktop, text-based or graphical; it’s grown significantly in size and professionalism over the last couple of years, and last year pretty definitively outgrew its previous venue. I am mentioning this well in advance because they’ve mentioned that tickets will be cheaper for early bird buyers — so it’s something to keep an eye on if you think you’ll want to go.

Mailbag: World Simulation for Story Generation

Hi Emily,

not sure if this is too specific a question, but I wonder if you can help me out:

Last NaNoGenMo I started out on doing a more sophisticated version of Meehan’s Talespin. I ended up doing lots of planning, but not too much implementation, so I’m going to continue my efforts this year. The biggest part of it all seems to be a world simulator. This would be where all the actions the characters are planning to do get executed. In a way this seems very similar to what is part of every IF/adventure game (locations, objects, etc), and I have programmed some of those in my micro computer days on a ZX Spectrum… But I feel this needs to be more sophisticated (and on a larger scale), and general, as there will be a multitude of possible actions that can modify the world state. And it might also have to be ‘fractal’ (for want of a better word), as there is landscape in the wild, cities (which are in the landscape, but consist of many locations where there would otherwise just be a single location of forest), and rooms in houses in cities, etc.

Are you aware of any systems in existence that I could use for that? I am kind of hoping it would be similar to a physics package for arcade games, a ready-made package that I can slot my content data and planner actions into. Or do I have to write my own?

Any pointers much appreciated!

I’ll try to answer this in its own terms below, but first I feel like those answers should come with some warnings.

This is presumably obvious, but there is no such thing as a generic world simulator. Any simulation is making decisions about what to model and what to ignore, what level of abstraction to use, what kinds of state are interesting to preserve, and so on. It’s misleading to think of “a world simulator” as “like” a physics engine. A physics engine is a type of world simulator, one that focuses on a comparatively well-defined kind of state: position, velocity, acceleration, elasticity, and so on. (I don’t mean it’s easy to write a good one! Just that the domain of simulation is reasonably defined.)

Text adventure world models tend to focus on rooms, furnishings, and items of the proper size to be carried by a human being, but that’s also very much a subset of what you might theoretically want to model. Items that are abstract (“love”, “communism”), intangible (“the smell of grass”, “a traumatic memory”), larger than a room (“Antarctica”), or smaller than a human being could pick up (“ant”, “quark”) are less likely to be simulated — though of course some of us have worked on extending the world model to include support for conversation topics, knowledge, and relationships.

Moreover, the choices you make about what to simulate will very heavily affect what kind of story you get out the other end. Finally, the way in which your simulation is described will affect how easily it can be plugged into a planner system.

I’d also warn against thinking of the content data as a minor aspect of the system. It’s common for research on story generation to focus on the process: is this grammar-based, is it a planner, is it partially ordered or not, are we forward-chaining or backward-chaining (or a little of each), are we planning the events of the story separately from the discourse layer, how are we measuring coherence and novelty (if those are even our concerns at all). Those are all interesting questions to ask, but the features of the content data also make a very significant difference to output quality, and a corpus implicitly encodes a lot of things about the possible story space that may not be inherently required by the generative method.

In every project I’ve worked on where there was a target output quality (as opposed to toy or experimental projects), most of my development time on a first release has gone into working and reworking the content data, rather than refining the process of generation. Once the qualities of a good data set are well understood, it’s possible to make additional data sets that conform to those expectations in significantly less time, and sometimes to support the process with tooling. But I tend to regard experiments in story generation to be fundamentally unfinished unless the experimenter also presents reasonably polished artifacts of their generative process. If they’re just describing a process and leaving high-quality artifact creation as an exercise for the future, then most of the work is (in my experience) still ahead of them.

So. That is the end of my speech. Now that we’re done with warnings:

Continue reading